Contents > Chapter 4: Life of the Barzakh > The Deobandi View of Life in Barzakh (1: The Righteous do not Die)


 

The Sufis have many self-contradictory and confusing concepts related to death, soul, grave and Barzakh.

  1. Some claim that the Messenger of Allah (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) and the ‘righteous saints’ are actually alive and in control of their senses, whilst they are being buried,

  2. Others believe that death just comes to them momentarily,

  3. Yet others even dislike the use of the term, ‘death’, and say ‘they have gone behind a curtain.’

 

The Deobandis have an amalgam of all these three false beliefs in their Aqeedah as will be analyzed in the course of this chapter.
 

The Deobandi View of Life in Barzakh

The Deobandis believe that the Messenger of Allah (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) is alive in his grave and can be benefited from, just as he could be benefited from, during his lifetime in this world. Fazaail-e-Aamaal is full of such quotations, which claim that the Messenger of Allah (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) is aware of the conditions of his Ummah (nation) and can physically help those who seek his assistance. They also claim that he (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) is in contact with the Deobandi scholars from whom he (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) learnt to speak the Urdu language.[1]

Moreover, the Deobandis extend these qualities to their dead Shaikhs and scholars, as is mentioned in their books. These false beliefs are responsible for the poor understanding of Tawheed and widespread misconceptions on issues of Aqeedah amongst the Deobandi masses and the cadre of the Jamaat Tableegh. Insha’Allah, these beliefs will be analyzed point by point.

 

Deobandi View - 1: The Righteous do not Die

1. Moulana Zakariyah mentions in Fazaail-e-Aamaal, “Shaikh Abu Ya’kub Sanusi says: ‘One of my disciples came to me and said: ‘I shall die tomorrow in the afternoon.’ The following day, the man came to the Holy Masjid at Makkah, observed his Zuhr Salaat, made ‘Tawaaf’ of the Holy Ka’bah, then went a little farther away from the Ka’bah and gave up his soul. I washed his body and arranged his burial. When I laid him in the grave, he opened his eyes. I asked him in surprise, ‘Is there life after death?’ He replied: ‘I am alive and he who is a true lover of Allah never dies.”[2]

 

2. “Abu Ali Radbari says: ‘A poor and ragged old man once came to me on Eid day and said: ‘Is there any neat clean place around where a poor man could meet his death.’ I thought he was not talking sense and said with unconcern, ‘Come in and lie where you like, and give up your soul.’ The man came in, performed wudhu (ablution) and observed a few Rakaat of Salaat. He then laid on the ground and his soul departed from his body. I washed his body, shrouded him and arranged his burial. When I was going to put him in his grave…I uncovered his face, he opened his eyes. I asked him in surprise, ‘Is there life after death?’ He replied: ‘I am alive and he who is a true lover of Allah never dies. Insha’Allah, I shall intercede for you on the Day of Resurrection, by virtue of the distinction granted to me by Allah.”[3]

 

3. “Abu Saeed Khazzaaz says that he was once staying in Makkah. One day, on coming out of the Bab-e-Bani Shaibah (a gate), he saw a very handsome man lying dead on the ground. He was looking at his face in surprise, when the dead man opened his eyes, smiled at him and said: ‘Abu Saeed, don’t you know that the friends of Allah (those who love Him truly) do not die; they are just transferred from this world to the next.’”[4]

 

4. “One Buzurg says that I gave Ghusl to a Mureed, he took grasped of my toe. I said: ‘Leave my toe, I know that you are not dead. This is only a transfer from one place to another.” He released my toe.”[5]

 

5. “Ibn ul-Jalaa, who is a well-known Sufi Shaikh, says that when his father died and his body was laid on wooden board for washing, he (the father) began to laugh. The people who had come to wash his body were terrified (to see a dead man laughing) and ran away. After a while, one of his father’s friends came and bathed him.”[6]


 


[1] Rasheed Ahmad Gangohi writes in Al-Baraheen al-Qaatiyah about the superiority of the Madrasa (school) of Deoband, he says, “It comes to my mind that the school of Deoband has an exalted position near Allah, because of the numerous scholars who have passed out from it and benefited the common folk. Subsequently, a noble person was blessed with a vision of the Prophet Muhammed (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam), in which he saw Allaah’s Messenger (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) speaking in Urdu. The noble person asked, ‘How do you know this language, while you are an Arab?’ He (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) said, ‘From the time I have been in contact with the scholars of the school of Deoband, I’ve known this language’.” Rasheed Ahmad Gangohi comments, “From this we understand the greatness of this Madrasa (school).” [Al-Baraheen al-Qaatiyah, p.30] (Click to view scanned image of the quote)

[2] Fazaail-e-Aamaal, (Eng. Trans.) Virtues of Charity, Chapter.6, p.599, (2nd South African Impression 1414-1993. Published by Waterval Islamic Institute)]

Fazaail-e-Aamaal, Virtues of Charity, (Hindi Translation), Chapter.6, p.702 (Idara Ishaat Diniyat, First Edition (1984).

[3] Fazaail-e-Aamaal, (Eng. Trans.) Virtues of Charity, Chapter.6, p.609, (2nd South African Impression 1414-1993. Published by Waterval Islamic Institute).

Fazaail-e-Aamaal, (Hindi. Trans.) Virtues of Charity, Chapter. 6, p.712 (Idara Ishaat Diniyat, First Edition (1984).

[4] Fazaail-e-Aamaal, (Eng. Trans.) Virtues of Charity, Chapter.6, p.610, (2nd South African Impression 1414-1993. Published by Waterval Islamic Institute).

[5] Fazaail-e-Aamaal, (Hindi. Trans.) Virtues of Charity, Chapter.6, p.702 (Idara Ishaat Diniyat First Edition (1984).

[6] Fazaail-e-Aamaal, (Eng. Trans.) Virtues of Charity, Chapter.6, p.599, (2nd South African Impression 1414-1993. Published by Waterval Islamic Institute)

Fazaail-e-Aamaal, (Hindi. Trans.) Virtues of Charity, Chapter.6, p.702 (Idara Ishaat Diniyat, First Edition (1984).