Contents > Chapter 7: Waseelah > Calling upon other than Allah is Shirk:


 

Calling upon other than Allah is Shirk:

As the Deobandi’s Kitabul Janaiz mentions, “The Islamic meaning of Waseelah does not consist of praying or making Du’aa to Rasoolullah or any other created being. Islam teaches that the only Being to whom prayers and Du’aa have to be directed is Allah. Directing one’s prayer and Du’aa to any being other than Allah is Shirk or polytheism, and Shirk is the worst of sins committed against Allah” [1]

 

Though the Deobandis consider direct invocation of other than Allah to be Shirk, the Fazaail-e-Aamaal has several incidents in ‘Virtues of Charity and Hajj’ that involve direct invocation to the Messenger of Allah (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam). Mentioned below are some of them:

 

1. In one story, a man named Abu Muhammad had to repay 80 gold coins that were kept as a trust with him. He spent the money and had no one who could help him repay back the 80 gold coins. So he ... “…then went to the grave of Rasoolullah, where he made Du’aa for the whole night, sometimes at the grave and sometime at the minbar (pulpit), begging for a way out of his predicament. In the latter part of the night, he heard a voice coming to him from the darkness near the grave saying, ‘O Abu Muhammad, take this’. My father stretched forth his hand and a bag was given to him. In it was 80 gold coins!”[2]

 

2. In another story, a traveler said at the grave of the Messenger of Allah (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam): “I have come from Egypt and for five months now, I have been in your presence. I beg of Allah and of you that one such person should take charge of feeding me, so that I be made able to depart homewards from here. Thereafter, I prayed for further things, went and sat down near the Minbar (pulpit).” A man then came to him and gave him food to eat that consisted of bread, ghee and dates. After the hungry man had eaten to his fill, he was given the remaining food in a basket along with about one sa’a (7 kilogram’s) of dates. The man (who fed the traveler) then said:  “By Allah, do not ever complain to my grandfather, Rasoolullah again. It disturbs him greatly. For, as long as, you remain here and whenever you have the need for food, it shall be sent for you.” He then sent a servant along with the traveler to reach him to the Prophet’s grave. Upon reaching Baqi, the traveler said to the servant, “It is all right, for now I know the way. You may return. The slave replied: “I have not the right to return without having left you at the grave. Perhaps, Rasoolullah will inform my master if I should.”[3]

 

3. “Hazrat Ibn Jalaa relates, “While in Medina, I once suffered tremendous hunger. It became so unbearable that I presented myself at the grave of Rasoolullah and said, “O Rasoolullah, I suffer great hunger. I am now your guest.” Thereafter, sleep overtook me and in a vision I saw Rasoolullah gave me a piece of bread. I ate half of it and when I woke up, I found myself with the other half of that piece of bread still in my hands.”[4]

 

4. “In Medina, there lived a woman from the Hashimi family, whose servants used to ill-treat her. She went with her complaints to Rasoolullah where she poured out her heart. From the grave was heard this reply, “Do you not prefer to follow my excellent example. Have patience, as I patiently persevered.” She said: ‘After hearing that voice all my grief disappeared and all the servants who used to annoy me passed away.”[5]

 

5. Yet in another story, three men fasted for days on end since they could not find food. One of them went to the grave of Rasoolullah and said: “O Rasoolullah hunger has overtaken us.” Soon afterwards ... “a man from Alawi family knocked at the door. We opened the door and found a man with two servants, each one carrying a large basket with many delicious foods.” The man from the Alawi family said before leaving, “You have complained about hunger to Rasoolullah. I have seen Rasoolullah in a dream and he commanded me to bring food to you.[6]


[1] Kitabul Janaiz (Hanafee), p.21-24.

[2] Fazaail-e-Aamaal, (Eng. Trans.), Virtues of Hajj, Chapter.9, p.177, story no.21, (New Edition 1982, Published by Dini Book Depot - Delhi). A similar story is mentioned on p.178 (story no.24)

[3] Fazaail-e-Aamaal, (Eng. Trans.), Virtues of Hajj, Chapter:. 9, p.180, story no28, (New Edition 1982, Published by Dini Book Depot - Delhi).

[4] Fazaail-e-Aamaal, (Eng. Trans.), Virtues of Hajj Chapter.9, p.178, story no.23, (New Edition 1982, Published by Dini Book Depot - Delhi). Similar incidents have been mentioned on p.171 (story no.8).

[5] Fazaail-e-Aamaal, (Eng. Trans.), Virtues of Hajj Chapter.9, p.175, story no.16, (New Edition 1982, Published by Dini Book Depot - Delhi)

[6] Fazaail-e-Aamaal, (Eng. Trans.), Virtues of Hajj, Chapter.9, p.177, story no.22, (New Edition 1982. Published by Dini Book Depot - Delhi). Similar stories have been mentioned on p.179 (story no.27) and p.181 (story no.29).